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Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall, a World Heritage Site, extends from Newscastle-upon-Tyne on the eastern coast to Carlisle on the western coast. The Roman Emperor Hadrian ordered the wall to be built as a barrier, to strengthen the northern borders of the Roman Empire in 120 AD. Built by elite Roman troops, when completed, it was 73 miles long, with walls ten feet thick and fifteen feet high. Any point along the wall is a memorable picnic spot.

South Shields Fort and Museum (South Shields) - This fort was a supply base for forts on Hadrian's Wall. The West Gate has been reconstructed and there is an ongoing excavation. Try your hand at archeology in a mock dig.
Museum of Antiquities (Newscastle upon Tyne) has models of what the wall looked like and a full size reconstruction of the temple to Mithras.
Poltross Burn Milecastle (Gilsand) - Castles (to house the soldiers) were built at Roman mile-long intervals along the wall. This milecastle is in especially good condition.
Roman Army Museum (Greenhead) - Excellent museum where you can find out about Roman weapons and day-to-day life of the soldiers that guarded Hadrian's wall. Video of "join the Roman army," and a excellent movie animation of an "eagle's view" of the wall in Roman times. Walk along the wall at Walltown Crags.
Cawfields to Winshields - Here are some of highest and most dramatic sections of the wall as it winds through the valley.
Vindolanda Fort and Museum (Bardon Mill) - This open air museum has reconstructions of the what the Hadrian's Wall looked like, a Roman temple, bathhouse and houses. Great place to run around. In the museum are all kinds of Roman artifacts - shoes, wheels, axes, iron and bronze implements.
Housesteads Roman Fort and Museum - Housesteads is the best preserved fort on the wall. Check out the Roman idea of bathrooms and running water.
Chesters Roman Fort and Museum (Chollerford) - Chesters is a cavalry fort and has remains of a Roman bath house.

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